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20121201
20121231
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followed suit and declined to a 16-month high. insurance surged 5% after hsbc explored a stake group. the nikkei closed at a seven-month high. shares gained 4% after the qualcomm investment firm. in south korea, samsung hit another all-time high, helping the kospi finish higher by .6 of a percent. this despite a slightly slower gdp growth in q3. back to you. >> sixuan, thanks very much indeed for that. that's feeding into european markets. flat as a pancake. this is where we stand. ftse 100 up half a percent. cac up 7%. break that down into sectors, you will see basic resources, best gainer. that son the back of the chinese data. banks not doing too badly as well, so europe helping out a little bit on that side as well. three sectors. household goods. certainly having the market impact at the moment. plenty of other data to go. on the debt markets, we'll keep our eyes on spanish auctions. probably nothing too much to worry about there. this is the service sector and the autumn statement will get a big focus for guilts today. 1.83% on the yields. on the currency markets, we talked abo
market news, a lot of talk about china this morning. a final reading of hsbc's manufacturing purchasing manager's survey for china rising in november, first time above the key 50 mark which indicates expanding rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens
will further dent profit growth this year. and hsbc reportedly might pay a fine of $1.8 billion as part of a settlement with u.s. law enforcement agencies. the settlement could be announced as soon as next week and has to do with money laundering lapses. the deal could be a test case for just how big a signal prosecutors want to send to halt the list of flows of money through u.s. banks. but that was billion with a b. let's get a check on the markets this morning. after the moves we saw yesterday, the dow up triple digits at one point. that the poebts you can see that the futures are indicated higher once again after it closed up about 85. in europe, right now at least there are some green arrows. best performer among those three indexes is the dax in germany. up 75. you also see gains with the cac in france and the ftse in london. in asia overnight, you did see slight drop by the hang seng and shanghai, those were big gainers the day before. and in japan, the nikkei up by 0.8%, kospi up 1%. oil prices this morning are trading up about 28 cents, 88.16. the ten year note this morning is
the focus turns once you have the news of monti's resignation. one thing we do want to note, hsbc had its rating cut from double a minus to double a. abercrombie & fitch, open humor out with a notice saying the retailer looks to the markets over the holidays. s intermec is looking to be up in 2013. jim, back to you. >> let's shift to the bonds and dollars. >> you know, looking at the ten-year, seeing it hovering around 160, is about as shocking as the sun coming up in the morning. but nonetheless, last week on interday trades, looked like we were going to close in the high 150s, which would have taken us back many more months. you can see the closing yield chart, going back all the way to august 1st. now, look at boon yields. political issues. you can have the best-laid plans by central banks in the end. ballot boxes, politics, it can get messy. think about what's going on here. now, if we look at the boon going back to august 1st, it's a differe bit of a different pattern. it is hovering at the lowest yields. it did close below yields since august. if we switch gears a bit, move a little
of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that are left. we have other news on wall street this morning, morgan stanley said to be considering asking th
. but it adds -- and then you've got all the stuff you were bringing up, hsbc, you've got the high frequency trading. you got the flash crash. you got the idea that it's not an even playing field. >> and then when interest rates are 1% or 2% people feel like no one knows what they should do. >> to what end? i think a big part of it is you have to step back and say what's the bigger picture? what's the concern? a lot of people feel like the system is rigged. so that, you know, one of the things that was interesting to me at e-trade was watching the evolution of self-directed to a need for guidance. sort of some level of guided advice. >> do you believe the -- do you believe that the retail investor has a fair shot? against the institutional investor? >> no. no. i do not. >> i do not. i think that at the end of the day to level the playing field, there are certain products and services that you can buy self-directed. >> shouldn't we be trying to level the playing field? >> of course. of course. >> but the answer is it's never going to be fair -- >> the same information as an institution -- >>
's second largest economy. hsbc's preliminary monthly purchasing manager index rose 50.9 from november's 50.5. also, china story. apple's iphone is officially on sale in china starting today. that should help apple reverse a slide in its market share in that really important area. but analysts say the key to apple's future in china is a tie-up with the telecom operator china mobile. the two have been in talks for years but haven't yet come to any agreement. and you wonder how much china, how much do they want? how much do you have to give up to get a part over there? almost everything, right? >> pretty much. all of your data, everything -- >> their way, they get your technology. do they get the lion's share of -- do they split anything down the middle? >> anyway let's talk about facebook. a major facebook lockup expiration is happening today. early employees' investors will get their first chance to sell about 156 million facebook shares since the ipo back in may. and joining us now on the "squawk" newsline, henry blodget, the ceo and editor in chief at business insider. good morning. >> go
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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